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PALISI Approved Survey: Open source pediatric medical devices in low-resource settings

Dear Colleague,

You are receiving this survey because you are subscribed to receive PALISI news and updates. We seek to elicit your thoughts on the feasibility of open source pediatric medical devices in low-resource setting. This survey is being distributed internationally to physicians, advanced practice practitioners, nurses, respiratory therapists and others caring for children.

Globally, pediatric morbidity and mortality remain highest in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) such as those in Sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia where the gross national income is less than $4000 per capita. In order to learn more about ways to combat these trends, researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital for Children and Boston Children’s Hospital are conducting a study entitled: Open Source Pediatric Medical Devices: An International Survey of Perspectives. This survey aims to collate the perspectives of relevant experts on the feasibility of increasing access to pediatric medical devices via open source designs in these parts of the world. To our knowledge, while there are multiple opinion papers and advocacy manuscripts on the topic, a global survey of experts has not been done, especially in the COVID or post-COVID era.

Participation in this study is entirely voluntary and confidential. You have the right not to participate and/or not to answer any of the questions. We estimate that completion of the survey will take approximately 5 to 10 minutes. No specific personal identifying data is collected in this survey other than country of practice. Please respond about your own practices, not your institution. Also feel free to disseminate this survey to others in your institution.

Please see the survey in this link: https://redcap.link/rv6y207u

Should you have any questions regarding this survey please feel free to contact the Principal Investigator at rcarroll4@mgh.harvard.edu. Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,

Ryan W. Carroll, MD, MPH



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